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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 79 (some duplicates have been removed)
to open a new chapter in relations. but for that to happen, france first needs to apologize. >> we want him to make a step, a concrete step towards repentance. there is no more hatred anymore. algeria is virgin territory industrially. today, france sees a chance to strengthen its economic ties with algeria because the stakes are so high at the moment. >> more than 3 million people of algerian origin live in france. many have dual citizenship. they make regular trips across the mediterranean, their cars piled high with goods bought in french shops. about halfway between paris and algiers, this gives a sense of how close the countries are, but the relationship between them is complicated. the french occupied algeria 132 years. for them, it was more than a colony. they considered algeria to be part of france. the war for independence was long and bloody. more than 1 million people were killed, both algerians and french. this person was born in algeria. so was his father, grandfather, and his great-grandfather. he and his family fled as refugees in 1962. he says the french built by jerry it
from france. the french president addressed the parliament a few hours ago. this was how the president responded to date. >> i recognize the suffering here that colonization inflicted on the algerian people. amongst these sufferings, there was a massacre in other places o f algeria. these are in the minds of the people but also of the french people. >> following that speech for us was our correspondent who explains now why president hollande avoided a more specific apology. >> it seems as though he is taking the route of truth than apologies or using the word sorry, because that would be very difficult for french people to swallow because after all suffering. these were people whose parents, grandparents, and great grandparents were born in algeria. president hollande would have alienated all those people and not done justice to their memories or their suffering if he came out with a one-sided apology. what he did do was in clear, unequivocal terms acknowledging the crimes of the past. >> it is about as gloomy as a prediction that could have been made about syria. >> we do not see any
forget that israel fought the 1967 war not with american arms but with french weaponry. france was their principal ally. before 1967, one israeli prime minister one time for one hour had visited the white house. it wasn't israel's founder. june 1964. today ariel sharon or any israeli prime minister comes to washington, it's obvious he will march into the white house. that began that very, very close relationship, that cooperation began in the aftermath of 1967, not before that. >> as you acknowledge, one more book on the six-day war. there have been a lot of them. what do you have new? what kind of things? >> look at my bibliography. i always encounter that question why we need another book on the 1967 war. the principle reason is the phenomenon of the 30-year rule. that is the rule that attained to most western style democracies in the united states in britain and canada and in israel which holds that after 30 years the majority of diplomatic documents previously classified as top secret are declassified and become accessible to researchers. once you have documents, it opens u
. pressure is increasing on israel over its plans to build 3000 homes in palestinian areas. france, britain, and spain are just a few of the countries which have summoned israel's ambassador to express their concerns. there are warnings that new settlements in east jerusalem and the west bank could threaten the very viability of a two- state solution. >> israel's prime minister does not shirk controversy and is not afraid of upsetting his friends, but benjamin netanyahu might suddenly be feeling rather isolated. a number of european countries are upset over the thorny issue of settlements. for years, israel has been warned by allies that continued expense of israel's settlements on occupied jewish land is detrimental to a two-state solution. it was when israel signalled its intention to develop this strategically-important area known as e-1 that the row intensified. if this big piece of land was to become a jewish settlement, detractors say it would be the final nail in the coffin of the two-state solution. with dozens of jewish settlements already in the area, it is argued that developing
but not necessarily using that word, sorry. there is lots of interest. there is the business relationships. france is the biggest foreign investor in algeria. francois hollande's claims france has created hundreds of thousands of jobs there, so it could be mutually beneficial for friends. there is a market for its products. also the creation of jobs, very important for a growing population. >> hundreds of people have paid their respects at a funeral for a health-care worker. they have since been suspended, but local health workers are considering vaccination's under police protection. police say a woman who was a gang rape on a bus is in critical but stable condition. the campaign is demanding a review of rape laws. the government says it will create five new courts to speed up prosecution. police have arrested five suspects and are looking for a sixth. in sri lanka, three days of deadly rains have caused landslides. at least 25 people have been killed, but the worst may not be over. >> he is lucky to be alive. his family escaped the dilution of mud that rolled down the mountain. >> of about 4:00
earners leave the country? sounds extreme? that's what's happening in france. the socialist government imposing a 75% tax on numbers higher than 1 million euros and stealth -- wealthy people are moving out of the country. good evening, sir. well, france, some people are fleeing to avoid the tax it's not illegal. but sens a message. >> it certainly does. it shows you that when government tries to increase income through the obvious measure -- let's raise tax rates on the richest people, the richest people don't like that. france's evidence, anecdotal, you have the actor who is moving out to a belgian town that is now a colony for french exiles. he is fleeing that 75% tax. the former ceo of loriele and a ceo giant. and it used to be that retirees would leave, after their kids haveh grown up and left home. but now it's young, dynamic millionaires, leaving france, in their peak earnings period. there is even harder evidence of the impact when you try to soak the rich. it showed up this week in britain. >> greta: in what way? >> well, britain, one year ago, basically, they had 16,000 filers
.k. or to france. a hat tip to the "new york post," owned by the parent company of the network. she was trying to audition by fundraisers and glossy spreads in the magazine. what do you think? quid pro quo? >> dana: yeah, i do. she is an accomplished woman. if you have a movie made that says you're the devil you'v youe something. >> greg: they made one for you. >> dana: i'll reserve comment whether she deserves it and would be a good ambassador. we talked about this eight months ago with a big event here. someone slipped it out she would love to be the u.k. ambassador. i think it could happen. >> andrea: do you think it's real or her floating her own name for job? >> greg: i would like to send her away. england sent us victoria beckham. six-figure exchange program. i could have used another word but decided to be clean. she tells an assistant to float it and it helps her keep her job another year. >> eric: last year we did the same story. >> andrea: this is the same woman that did the glossy spread on bashar assad, the syrian dictator that murdered all the people. great judgment, don't you thi
that there was someone there... that's an amazing thing. ♪ >> sean: millionaires tax is costing france one of its fails actors. it started when he announced he will bid adieu to his french citizenship and move to belgium to escape the burdonsome tax rates. a million euros are taxed at a 75% rate that. didn't sit well with the french prime minister, who blasted the actor, calling his decision, unpatriotic and pathetic. the french actor has fired back, chastising the prime minister saying, i don't want expect to be pitied or praised, but i reject the word pathetic. he said, we will no longer have the same country. i am a true european, a citizen of the world and i hand over my passport and my social security card -- which i have never used. joining me with the author of the joy of hate, a new york times best seller, greg gutfeld. how are you? >> good to see you? >> what's going on? >> same old thing. hanging out. >> sean: congratulations on the good book tour. he's my favorite french actor. my favorite frenchman at this point. >> so you are devastated? >> sean: no. it's interesting. they thought, they we
magazine editor anna wintour oz our next u.s -- as our next u.s. ambassador to the u.k. or maybe to france. white house with press secretary jay carney defended the idea, insisting that nondiplomats like ms. wintour can make good envoys. >> what qualities does the president look for when he's going to pick an ambassador? an important ally like france or the u.k.? >> you know, i think that the president in all of his personnel appointments looks for talent, wisdom and character in his appointees, and he would do that regardless of the position. >> is it important for a diplomat to be diplomatic? [laughter] >> one of the, i mean, another way of addressing that is to answer the question there have been enormously effective diplomats in this country's history who have not necessarily risen through the diplomatic corps. we had one of the greatest diplomats of his generation pass away not long ago, richard holbrooke, and i think everyone who knew him or sat across from the table from him would agree he was not by anyone's traditional definition particularly diplomatic. >> no. but he was also a b
or medicine, physics, chemistry, and economics went to eight winners from the u.s., japan, france, and britain. >> the nobel prize for economics was jointly awarded to allan ross and lloyd shapley for their work on matching supply and demand -- alvin roth and lloyd shapley for their work on matching supply and demand. 89-year-old lloyd shapley, professor emeritus at the university of california, received a standing ovation. >> while the eu is celebrating winning the nobel peace prize, one of its largest member states has been plunged into crisis. >> first data appeared that italy was facing the prospect -- first, it appeared that italy was facing the prospect of uncertainty as mario monti appeared to be on the prospect of resigning. that pushed the stock market into a downward slide. >> in the last couple of hours, prime minister mario monti has come out and said he is not planning to step down in the near future after all, and that the nervous reaction in the markets should not be dramatized. >> investors are already nervous about what mario monti's early departure could spell for the eurozon
coming in across the western british aisisles ann towards france and spain. this is going to be rain rather than snow getting warmer here. the frigid air to the east. tomorrow on your thursday, 2 degrees in london. 1 degree in paris but in to friday the temperatures rebound to averages. about 11 degrees for you in london so it's feeling warmer i should say. out towards the east, we have plenty of sub zero temperatures for the highs. minus 5 in stockholm. minus 5 in warsaw and minus 3 in vienna. i'll leave you now with your extended forecast. >>> we're back in 30 minutes with more of the latest. i'm gene otani in tokyo.
in across the uk, down into much of france. flooding is likely. it should be fine across much of the iberian peninsula, 15 degrees expected in madrid. further east, this extends through north africa, so for both tripoli and benghazi, it will be cloudy, the chance of some showers. 19 degrees in cairo as a maximum. along the coast, for the west, whitely dryer -- likely dryer. solutions for america, friday, 7:00 p.m. eastern, 4:00 p.m. pacific. >> hello again. top stories on al jazeera, at least 30 people have been killed in southeastern kenya. the deaths in the delta region have been blamed on fighting between the orma and pokomo tribes. the first round of the draft for the egyptian constitution is planned for friday. u.s. president barack obama says he will work with congress to avert spending cuts and tax hikes in the new year. where republicans budget bill to avert the -- a republican budget bill to avert hit the fiscal cliff was killed in the house. 20 people have been killed in flash floods and landslides in sri lanka. 14 people are missing. tens of thousands of people have been affected.
foreign jihadists, is a malley, germany, u.k. and france on the ground in syria. that man said he wants to establish strict adherence to shariah law in syria adding that the taliban is example to follow. >> opposition has to take steps to isolate extremists and those with a different agenda. >> the leader is pushing the u.s. to reconsider the decision to label militant islamic use to claim religion is legitimate motivating factor for the rebels. the u.s. says the group is a front for al-qaeda in iraq. chris? >> chris: thanks. >> you're welcome. >> chris: federal appeals court struck down the nation's last date wide been a on carrying concealed weapons. illinois now has 180 days to write a new law permitting people to carry guns for self-defense. unfortunately, no one armed or otherwise was able to stop a young man with an illegal gun from fatally shooting two people and himself at a suburban portland, oregon, shopping mall tuesday. correspondent dan springer says it could have been worse. >> cell phone video shows the kay yous in a mall in -- chaos in mall in portland. they ran for live
times that of france or australia. it is 12 times higher than the average for other developed countries. why is that? if psychology is the main course, we should see that we have 12 times as many psychologically disturbed people as the average. we don't. in fact, america takes mental disorders seriously, treats them and doesn't stigmatize them. we do better in this area than most of our peers. is america's popular culture much worse than other rich countries? not really since it's largely the same popular culture worldwide. england and wales are exposed to cultural influences as the u.s. yet, their rate of gun homicide is some 3% of ours. the japanese are at the cutting edge of the world of video games, yet the u.n. puts their gun homicide rate at close to zero. why? well, they have one of the most restrictive series of gun laws in the world. when looking internationally, it is obvious that the one feature of america that would explain why we have so much more gun violence than the rest of the rest of the world is that we have incredibly permissive laws allowing the sale and possession
and east jerusalem. on top of that britain, france and sweden summoned the israeli ambassadors to their country to condemn this move and france and england have said there is an appetite to disapprove of israel right now. what's happening to the tense situation there? >> the israeli response of calling for a settlement construction is a response that's viewed negatively across the international community by the united states as well as in many parts of israel itself. so it's a move intended to play to the base of benjamin netanyahu's core constituency. it doesn't help build confidence in a diplomatic process. this reiterates why the united states does need to be involved and engaged in resolving this issue. both side right now are using international pressure points to try to make their arguments and really are stuck in a stalemate. >> joel rubin. great to have you here. thank you, sir. of course the big breaking news we told you earlier from england. prince william and kate are expecting their first baby april a future heir to the throne. we'll bring you the details next. conc
. we have disagreements with canada on trade issues. we have disagreements with france and mexico and many other countries. there is a mechanism by which we can all go to neutral refereeing of those issues. the wto is one way that we can do that. [inaudible] >> i did not have a chance to read that article. am not familiar with everything that was mentioned in that article. two months before the election, there was this big tough-on- china -- >> the pivot was announced almost a year before that. what set of the discussion of the exhibit was the announcement -- pivot was the announcement of rotating 2000 marines throughout australia. i do not think china should be fearful of 2000 marines hit in australia. -- in australia. our engagement with other countries throughout the asia- pacific region will focus on more cultural, economic assistance as well as military collaboration. even with china itself, we're engaging more with china. this has been from the very beginning of the obama administration and is also part of the pivot. the pivot is not just focusing our attention on the other
or france. those are the kind of alabamaships that go to big donors she has been one of the top political supporters and fundraiser. asked jay carney about this report today he neither confirmed or denied. the nfl player who murdered his girlfriend and then killed himself apparently spent some time before the crime at another woman's apartment. details on that and what his own mother says she saw him do on the day that ended in blood. and word police here in new york city have now caught the suspect who is accused of pushing somebody right in front of a subway. and wait until you hear where they found him. that's ahead from the journalists of fox news on this tuesday fox report. can i help you? i heard you guys can ship ground for less than the ups store. that's right. i've learned the only way to get a holiday deal is to camp out. you know we've been open all night. is this a trick to get my spot? [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. save on ground shipping at fedex office. a new way to save on your prescriptions. it's the aarp medicarerx saver plus plan from unitedhealthcar
allen with the top stories from "politico." and mika should be jetting in from the south of france just in time to say hello to her father. first, though, let's send it to bill karins with a check on the forecast. >> good morning to you, joe. you got to d.c. a day too late. yesterday, it had to have been the warmest day you'll see probably till about april. it was 72 degrees yesterday in washington, d.c. it was even in the 60s all the way as far north as buffalo, syracuse and rochester. things are coming back to reality. cold front's heading through. chillier air is arriving, especially western new york. some showers out ahead of that front. if you're leaving the house now in maine, coastal new hampshire down through boston out on the cape, you're going to get light showers over the next hour or on two. you also have a few showers that will be ending shortly. look how warm it is when you step out your door. even at this hour, philadelphia. but look back to your west. the colder air is arriving. already in the 30s, pittsburgh and buffalo. and even buffalo could get snow showers later on
rates is untenable. i mean, we're not talking about raising taxes like france to 75%, to the top rate. we're talking about 39.6, and let's be honest, with other loopholes and other deductions, it's going to be a lot lower. at the end of the day, you cannot deal with the fiscal situation this country faces without raising taxes, raising revenues. it's that simple. >> because we're only bringing in 17% of the gdp and sending 23 or 24. >> 15 1/2. >> i've got a new number. you sure that's the recent one? >> that's the most recent one -- >> there's a big differential. >> we're not bringing enough for everybody. but the ironic thing, and what makes us different from greece in this regard, i think a lot of the functionality is alarmingly familiar. but if we go over the cliff, what we actually do is resolve too much of our debt situation all at once. i mean, unlike greece, whose fiscal profglasy has them where they are today. >> except that if we go over the cliff and given how tenuous this economic environment is right now, i mean, the message that sends to business leaders, employers, let a
its own u.s. leadership on the world stage countries like france and turkey. this is not an administration that is interested in powerfully projecting american leadership internationally. we now see, of course, the middle east going up in flames. and there is absolutely no leadership whatsoever coming from washington at this time. i describe the obama president's foreign policy as an absolute disaster. one that has significantly undercut key u.s. allies, including of course israel and great britain while appeasing america's enemies on the world stage. from iran, for example through to sudan to north korea and now, of course, we see the situation in egypt significantly deteriorating. and barely a word of condemnation coming from the obama administration with regard to morsi's dictatorship in cairo. >> obviously retreating on freedoms without a doubt, clamping down on personal liberty, religious liberty. that's a big concern with morsi. and human rights activists around the world are very concerned about that we didn't mention benghazi yet. but obviously we hav
. >> let me guess you live in france. >> how did you know? >> oh, nailed it. >> bill: so you are roaming around dc i always ask this question but it's interesting to me. you talk to, what, a couple of dozen people. >> about two dozen. so, what percentage of them had any clue at all what's at stake here? >> i say half of them clueless on the cliff. >> half of them no idea. >> it's boring. they are talking about trillions of dollars. they do this man who cried wolf all the time. they have these cliffs with the debt ceiling with the bush tax cuss. people are numb to this. they do this every christmas. they don't care. >> look, number one when you say 16 trillion-dollar debt it doesn't mean anything to anybody. >> you can't wrap your head around that. >> bill: make your car payment take your car away they know. number two, it's a pretty complicated situation. it's not just raising the taxes on wealthy and corporations. it's a lot of other stuff involved in it as well. but, out of the two dozen people, were there anybody -- was there one person who really had a handle on it? >> well, we ran i
from both france and in washington sent a telegram to the embassies, which is not far away and i might telegram there was a message from kissinger, secretary of the state department, telling us the israelis, wait. hold your horses. do not take action because kissinger is going to move on with provided doctors. when the telegram was sent from the state department to the embassy during yom kippur, the egyptian and syrian armies were already on their way to destroy the jewish state. that is an example of a mistake because the leader at the time, she was afraid to take a preemptive attack. she was afraid to hold the reserve because she said i don't know what will be the reaction in washington. and dr. kissinger was very strong. nixon was going down, he was going up and she was afraid from his reaction. because of her approach, we almost lost the world. that is why today we do with the issue of iran, we have to take the decision which is good for israel. maybe it will not be popular in the u.n. for sure. everything you say about israel and the standard of the one sponsored by u.s. money of
the early days of aids activism in the u.s. film director david france posted a clip from his final interview with spencer cox after his death this week. >> i don't know what is going to happen. i don't know what is one happened today or next year. i just know you keep going. you keep progressing, you keep hoping. until you die. which is would happen someday. you make your life as meaningful as you can make it. you lived it. don't be afraid of who is going to like you or are you be inappropriate or are you being -- you worry about things like being kind. >> and those are some of the headlines. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman with juan gonzalez. >> welcome to all our listeners and viewers from around the country and around the world. we begin today's show with a look at the capture of osama bin laden, which is the focus of the controversial new movie, "zero dark thirty," which was released this week. billed as the story of history's greatest manhunt for the world's most dangerous man, the film has come under harsh criticism from r
possibility similar to france and china and our chairman here included to that. the recent gao preliminary assessment of california's cost estimates show california high-speed rail authority has secured 11.5 billion from federal and state forces and still needs a shortfall of 57 billion to move forward. to put this investment into the 1950s, congress took old action to invest in its infrastructure and create a system. the system to be five years to build and after several editions a total length. the cost of construction has been estimated at over 425 billion in today's dollars that we're making that same decision. cert and we shouldn't afford at this time. urban mobility report by texas transportation institute found the cost of the slow speed but we currently have on long delays and endless congestion can dniester cost the united states over $100 billion annually. now it's time to make the investment for alternatives to congested highways and simultaneously create jobs. the intercity passenger rail service is one of those alternatives that many speed trumps long delay that faces our nati
war. you don't see france going to war with germany or russia with poland. it used to happen all the time, but it's not happening. the best example of all was just a couple of weeks ago when gaza was fighting -- the palestinians were fighting with the israelis, and they lobbed a couple of missiles into tel aviv. i'm sure that both people on both sides could see that the day was coming that they'd be lobbing missiles into jerusalem. and this is what both the christian the jewish religion began there, and it's the holy land. it's some of the greatest tourist attractions in the world. people want to come from all overed world to see it, but not when a war is going on. they realized within a week of war they had made a terrible mistake to go to war. even though it's better to grumble at each other, but not to be shooting at each other and causing damage and wrecking the economy and upsetting people all over the world because these pictures, you have the bbc and cnn there having the pictures of the grandmothers and grandfathers and little children lined up on the street in front of ho
. that includes eight days in january and two in august. i mean, you have to have august off, right? france. compare that to the average american worker to works about 230 days a year. writer for the national review and maria, a cnn contributor. i'm sure we can all agree we would love that schedule. especially if your compensation remained what it was. now, eric cantor, being serious here, says the new calendar allows lawmakers a week a month to spend back at home. when ip did the math, 126 days in washington is 25 workweeks. that's only 50% of the year. >> erin, members of congress are still doing their jobs when they are in their constituencies, when they are reaching out to their constituents. they are still working on legislation and much else. if you are concerned about congress wasting time, we ought to be more concerned about the fact that individual candidates are raising money rather than parties. that's the thing that really distracts them from the hard work of legislating. being out there in their districts, that's actually really, really important as a part of their job. >> i th
. france, a coded letter sent in 1812 by na popoleon bonaparte, saying that force that was then. now selling for more than $243,000. that's a wrap on the fox trip around the world in 80 seconds. disaster in a state left devastated by superstorm sandy, but this one man made. a train carrying toxic car ge goes off the track and people forced from their homes for days now, and now, another setback in the cleanup efforts. and also, we've all seen our fair share of silly criminal stories, come on admit it, they never get old. and why this pair of ban did i understand could take the cake. >> i think this'll be on world's dumbest criminals, they came in here unequipped and unprepared and ended up leaving their vehicle here. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800
francois o'land of france thinks? >> normally they do because these two countries have been very friendly with israel in recent years but israel is in an election period before january 22 when netanyahu stops the gaza war without a land operation. there are a lot of people saying, hey, you didn't go all the way against hamas. they ate into a huge share of his voters. i think he wants to say no one is going to be able to outflange me from the right. part of the tragedy of this conflict is that the parties cannot agree on a common definition of what is provocative except they agree on one thing. that they each assume the worst of the other side's ultimate intention. israel might say, look, this is political theater. ultimately we're going to discuss this. there will be a two-mile tunnel from north to south. we won't receiver the west bank at all, but the media, the government, everyone says, no, no, there must be something nefarious going on here. they need to get to the negotiating table and discuss the most sensitive issues. >> suarez: ground hasn't been broken on a single house. who is i
rates is unten nabl. i mean, we're not talking about raising tacks like france from 75% to the top rate. we're talking about 39.6 and let's be honest, with other loopholes and deductions, it's going to be a lot lower. at the end of the day, you cannot deal with the fiscal situation that this country faces without raising taxes and revenues. it's simple. >> we're only bringing in 17%çf the gdp and spending 23 or 24. >> 15 1/2. >> i've got a new number. are you sure that's the recent number? >> anyway, we're not bringing in enough revenue. et ironic thing which makes us different from greece in this regard is a lot the dysfunction nalt is alarmingly familiar. if we go over the cliff, we resolve too much of a debt situation all at once, unlike greece where they are today, interestingly, if you actually go over the cliff, you get on a budget path that's a far more sustainable than the current one, we do it much too quickly. >> except if you go over the cliff and given how tenuous this economic environment is right now, the message it sends to business leaders, employers, this place is not
name that came up is anna winter as the possible ambassador to france or the uk. she's the inspiration for "the devil wears prada." how does >>> good evening, americans, and welcome to "the ed show" from new york. president obama has john boehner boxed in and is done playing games. now it's getting good. this is "the ed show." let's get to work. >> let's allow higher rates to go up for the top 2%. that includes all of you. >> the president holds the line on taxes and draws the line on ç the debt ceiling. >> i will not play that game. >> tonight, democratic whip steny hoyer gives me the latest fiscal cliff developments and the democratic line on medicare. tom perriello from the center of american progress action fund on how democrats can deal with republicans who can't deal with reality. rubio and ryan reload with a new message for the middle class. >> both parties tend to divide americans into our voters and their voters. >> but there is no escaping their own policies. >> we're going to a majority of takers versus makers in america. >> dnc chair debbie wasserman schultz responds tonig
that slavery was less expensive than these new forms? brazil, u.s., britain, france, spain. >> a very interesting question. i think my first response would be to say i'm not sure so much that all forms of slavery disappeared as so much evolved in transition. obviously, there were laws passed that made a certain thing illegal. from a paper law stand point certain things disappeared. but the case of bonded labor it showed that things did not disappear but adapt to a different set of laws and climate. then evolved around those hurdles to continue to effect the same kind of mode of exi ployation. as to whether f there was a point in the past where producers were faced with a scenario where one set of nonslave-like labor bake more economic efficient there are certainly few instances. i think the historians here would probably have those more in their head than i do. particularly in case where is laws with penalties were perceived to be enforced. then the perception is that form of exploitation is no longer beneficial. we either have to evade it and try to do something similar or adopt for
but promoting war on the big red dragon-- the communist party. in the south of france it's believed by new ages to be the only safe place in the world. something to do with the shape of the mountain which overlooks the village. but today t.v. crews and police outnumbered prophets of doom. >> sreenivasan: in this country, nasa has produced a video to reassure those who need it. it's titled "why the world didn't end yesterday." the president of russia vladimir putin put new distance today between his government and the regime in syria. in his annual news conference, putin insisted his country is not protecting syrian president bashar assad. he urged assad to hold talks with the opposition, and negotiate an end to the bloodshed. >> ( translated ): we are not concerned about the fate of assad's regime. we understand what is going on there and that his family has been in power for 40 years. the changes are undoubtedly needed. we are worried about a different thing-- what next? we simply don't want the current opposition, having become the authorities, to start fighting the people who are the current
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 79 (some duplicates have been removed)